New logo ideas?

I’m trying to teach myself to be better at graphics, video etc and am finding Canva an incredible resource.

Playing around with ideas for a simple logo for myself and this is what I’ve come up with so far. Any thoughts?

Playing with other logo ideas and in particular stickers and labels for an exciting new venture that Michael and I have been working on and will be launching shortly!

What do you think?

I think its very eye catching and effective! Your thoughts?

And here is one that we decided we didn’t want to go for: (but I do love the illustrated jackdaw!)

Do you agree that we made the right decision?

Haven’t yet built the above website, but working on it. Our medicinal mushroom extracts are a-brewing though and will be available shortly!

Books, books, books! Recommendations

There are soo very many books that inspire me and that I learn from. Here is a small selection of books and authors whom I admire and respect. Among many others! I’ll do more posts with other books to share with you another time as well.

This is one book post of many: as I am a huge book-aholic! It’s an addiction that I am happy to feed. There are more book posts here in my blog and on Instagram.


I get asked so often to recommend books and resources that I like to learn from. The following are some excellent places to start! 

Hedgerow Medicine by Julie Bruton-Seal and Matthew Seal. The book focuses more on medicinal plants, how to identify, harvest, process, recipes. A great place to start from and a beautiful book, full of recipes and methods to use these local wild plants as medicine. (Plus, having met them a couple of times- they are beautiful people!)

River Cottage Mushrooms by John Wright. A great beginners guide to edible fungi and their dangerous lookalikes. I also enjoy listening to his other Foraging books on Audibles. 

Edible Mushrooms by Geoff Dann highly recommended.

Trees in Britain by Roger Phillips (also any or all of his Foraging books, he’s a legend, who sadly just passed recently). If you’re interested in mushrooms, you’ll soon learn that you need to know the trees!

The Forager Handbook by @miles_irving_wild_food High end and Chefy recipes and an excellent resource of edible wild foods found in the UK and Ireland. A fellow Association of Foragers member. Not a beginners book I would say but it’s a great compilation of wild plants and elaborate recipes.

Eat Weeds Cookbook by @eatweedsuk Robin Harford. Another Foraging wild food legend and fellow AoF member. His website is comprehensive and I’d recommend signing up to his mailing list.

Extreme Greens Understanding Seaweeds by Sally McKenna a great book with seaweed ID and delicious easy to use recipes to incorporate seaweeds into your every day diet.

New Wildcrafted Cuisine by @pascalbaudar I love all of his books, a pioneer in new wild food processes including Fermentation. Follow him on Instagram and you can also sign up for his online classes.


@alysf Alys Fowler The Thrifty Forager
. Beautiful simple to follow book, she has another one about preserving also. Great for urban foraging.


Botany in a Day @thomasjelpel I’m excited to be learning more about identifying plant families with this book. He also sells a card game to help learn these skills.


#foraging #wildfood #fungi #wildmushrooms #fermentation #preservation #selfsufficiency #books #workshops

Mushroom Books I recommend

I am asked all the time what books I recommend.

This is difficult to answer as there are so many different ways to be interested in fungi- whether it is identification, edibility, medicinal mushrooms, cooking mushrooms or wild food, cultivation, mycology… the list goes on. I am interested in most of these aspects, but I am aware this could quickly become overwhelming to a newcomer. Also of note is that one should seek out mushroom books that are local to their part of the world.

Another important consideration is that while I value buying vintage and second hand whenever possible- when you are relying on mushroom books to give you safe and up to date information- I do not recommend old books. The information is changing constantly, not only the classifications and taxonomy but the information on safe edibility of mushrooms in older books can be suspect and no longer recommended, such as the culmulatively toxic Brown Roll Rims. So, find it second hand if you can- but get your books recent and up to date.

This list will evolve and I will add to it over time, I’ll just get a start on it tonight…

I will list some books I love or recommend and why here:

Mushrooms River Cottage by John Wright

I highly recommend this book for all beginning mushroom foragers. The River Cottage Mushroom book by John Wright is an excellent resource for those that are interested in foraging for edible mushrooms. There are great photos, clear information, a slight sense of humour and importantly he points out when there is a dangerous look-alike to be aware of. There are some very tasty recipes at the end of the book in true River Cottage style. I like John Wright and also might say while I am here that I also enjoyed this one:

The Forager’s Calendar- A Seasonal Guide to Nature’s Wild Harvests by John Wright

I downloaded this Audibles audio version of this book: The Forager’s Calendar- A Seasonal Guide to Nature’s Wild Harvests. I love listening to audio books in the car while driving and this one is informative and entertaining. Its good because he covers wild food and fungi throughout the season and what you might expect to find in any average month of the year and some tips about how he likes to use these ingredients.

book-entangled-life-by-merlin-sheldrake

I wouldn’t hesitate in recommending this book to anyone, no matter what your interests are! I have both this copy AND the audio version. It is narrated by the author Merlin Sheldrake and I cannot get enough of it. An incredible book that covers the many and diverse ways of “How Fungi make our worlds, change our minds and shape our futures.”

Absolutely mind-blowing and hugely entertaining.

I would LOVE LOVE to have a coffee with Merlin one day:)

Courtney’s pared back mushroom stack – there are many many more in the collection- but these are some!

Let’s start with the one in the centre: the second one that I recommend to any new mushroom forager to be: Edible Mushrooms: A Forager’s Guide to the Wild Fungi of Britain, Ireland and Europe

I highly recommend this book, both to beginning foragers and experienced foragers alike. It has many species and what I like best is Geoff’s book stands alone in my opinion with its attention to the “Spectrum of Edibility”. So many books copy each other and err on the side of over-caution and preach to the lowest denominator. Geoff touches on this spectrum in detail and gives information about how and under what conditions each mushroom is edible or it isn’t. For example, many books might state: inedible, not recommended or unknown about edibility but Geoff gives us more detail than most- sometimes its a case of boiling before cooking, or cooking at high heat, etc to remove certain toxins. I respect and value this information so that I may make the decision myself, rather than be told simply: not recommended. And of course, should a mushroom not be recommended for consumption- this is also clearly stated!

Again, great photos, great information and again a warning on dangerous look-alikes.

Another book from that book stack above:

The Fungal Pharmacy by Robert Dale Rogers.

Fungal Pharmacy The Complete Guide to Medicinal Mushrooms and Lichens of North America.

While, granted, this book says it is for North American species, most of it is also relevant to Ireland/Uk/ Europe. Many of these medicinal mushrooms also grow here so there is much valuable information if you’re interested in mushrooms’ medicinal qualities.

From Jelly ears, Shiitake, Fly Agaric, Reishi, Lion’s Mane, Button mushrooms, Oysters, the list goes on and on.

Robert Rogers has a good online medicinal mushrooms course that I also can recommend.

Next on the list:

Chanterelle Dreams, Amanita Nightmares- The Love Lore and Mystique of Mushrooms by Greg Marley

Throughout history, people have had a complex and confusing relationship with mushrooms. Are fungi food or medicine, beneficial decomposers or deadly “toadstools” ready to kill anyone foolhardy enough to eat them? In fact, there is truth in all these statements. In Chanterelle Dreams, Amanita Nightmares, author Greg Marley reveals some of the wonders and mysteries of mushrooms, and our conflicting human reactions to them. With tales from around the world, Marley, a seasoned mushroom expert, explains that some cultures are mycophilic (mushroom-loving), like those of Russia and Eastern Europe, while others are intensely mycophobic (mushroom-fearing), including, the US.

This fascinating and fresh look at mushrooms-their natural history, their uses and abuses, their pleasures and dangers-is a splendid introduction to both fungi themselves and to our human fascination with them. From useful descriptions of the most foolproof edible species to revealing stories about hallucinogenic or poisonous, yet often beautiful, fungi, Marley’s long and passionate experience will inform and inspire readers with the stories of these dark and mysterious denizens of our forest floor.

Jelly Ear Mushrooms- a local and abundant medicinal mushroom

Hmmmm? What’s that you say? Can’t hear you from my Jelly Ear!

(Even if it’s the biggest Jelly Ear I’ve ever spotted!)

These abundant, edible and medicinal fungi were a bit challenging to me before, I must admit.

The gelatinous texture isn’t one that I was accustomed to eating but it’s grown on me! The distinctly ear lobe shape didn’t help either. 😂

This mushroom can be found commonly growing on dead or dying Elder trees. Sometimes you can hit the jackpot and find branches heaving with them.

Another name for this fungus is Auricularia aurícula-judae, Wood Ear, Black fungus, Cloud Ear, Judas Ear or more controversially Jews Ear/ although this name is no longer recommended.

These can be harvested throughout the year, and can even be found shrivelled up on the tree after a dry spell. They dry down very small and rehydrate readily when needed. Love finding them plump and fat and juicy but you can collect the dried ones too, saving you the job of drying them out!

I harvest, clean, slice and dry these to preserve them for use throughout the year. Then rehydrate when needed.

If cooked fresh in a frying pan they can be quite explosive!

I enjoy them most sliced into a Chinese dumpling with other wild greens and aromatics.

Another favourite amongst the Foraging world was dreamt up by @fergustheforager many years ago and takes the intact dried jelly ears and rehydrates them into a liqueur then covers them in chocolate.

This mushroom has been used medicinally since the Tang Dynasty 618 BCE in China, often added to dishes to help improve breathing, sore throats, to reduce colds and fevers, to enhance well being and to boost circulation.

One to look out for on your wild food or herbal medicine journey.

#jellyearfungus #medicinalmushroom #foodasmedicine #fungi #fungus #forager #wildfood

Mushroom Foraging Ireland Facebook group

Photograph by Courtney Tyler, Inkcaps mushrooms, Kent, UK

A wonderful learning resource! I set up this group in September 2019 and there are now well over 10k members. Its been incredible to see Ireland’s interest in fungi explode!

Feel free to join the group here, a great place to ask for assistance in identifying a mushroom, to see what’s in season, to share recipes and information and connect with other mycophiles!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1431909853617055

Eatweeds Podcast with Robin Harford, myself and Fergus Drennan about the Fantastical Fly Agaric as Food and Medicine

Was very honoured to take part in this conversation. Sorry that I had serious trouble with my sound quality which I lament really detracts from the listening experience. Here we discuss Fergus Drennan and my famed Fly Agaric event, we talk about the food and medicine of the Fly Agaric mushroom and in particular many people contact me about having listened to the segment where we discuss using the alcoholic extract as an external remedy for pain relief and in particular against sciatica pain.

Gourmet edible mushrooms- dried morels for sale

I’ve just added a new dried gourmet mushroom to the shop- the delicious morel mushrooms. Verpa bohemica.

Absolutely bloody delicious!

Rehydrate in boiling water (DO NOT toss that precious liquid- keep that as mushroom stock for a sauce!) then cook and add to your favourite recipe.

25gram is the quantity that is shown in the photo. If you would like mulitples of this please just add more to the cart. The link to purchase these from my shop is here: https://www.hipsandhaws.com/product/dried-gourmet-morel-mushrooms-verpa-bohemica/

You can hear me discuss mushrooms more in some of my podcast interviews which can be found at this link: https://linktr.ee/Hipsandhawswildcrafts

I teach various workshops around the many edible, medicinal, toxic and entheogenic and artistic qualities of fungi and medicinal mushrooms. You can book into these events at the same link as above.

€5.50 flat rate shipping throughout Ireland, the UK and Europe. €10 flat rate to the USA and Canada. Ask for shipping quotes if you’re elsewhere!

25 gram dried morel mushrooms – gourmet edible mushroom